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dc.contributor.authorBozin, Danielleen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:08:26Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:08:26Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.date.modified2013-04-29T02:42:57Z
dc.identifier.issn18378757en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/49960
dc.description.abstractThis article critiques the usefulness of habitual residence as the sole connecting factor in Hague Child Abduction Convention cases. This is achieved by examining the quality of this jurisdiction in light of changes in the gender dynamics underpinning international parental child abduction and the transnational family phenomenon. Arguably, the child's habitual residence as a home environment of the nature anticipated by the Convention's drafters is an increasingly outdated construct. This is due to an increase in both the number of abducting primary-carer mothers, and their families' growing mobility. Judicial determinations of habitual residence made during Convention return proceedings are entrenched in the state centric paradigm. This paradigm is becoming increasingly incompatible with the lives of families which experience international parental child abduction.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent108171 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherThomson Reutersen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.thomsonreuters.com.au/family-law-review-online/productdetail/105697?id=857en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto17en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalFamily Law Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume3en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchFamily Lawen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode180113en_US
dc.titleRe-examining habitual residence as the sole connecting factor in Hague Convention child abduction casesen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Lawen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2012 Thomson Legal & Regulatory Limited. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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