Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMazerolle, Lorraineen_US
dc.contributor.authorRansley, Janeten_US
dc.contributor.editorRichard Johnstone and Rick Sarreen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:17:54Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:17:54Z
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.date.modified2010-08-30T07:03:32Z
dc.identifier.issn13266004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/5027
dc.description.abstract'Third party policing' describes police efforts to persuade or coerce third parties, such as landlords, parents, local governments and other regulators, and business owners, to take some responsibility for preventing crime or reducing crime problems. In third party policing, the police create crime control guardians in locations or situations where crime control guardianship was previously absent. Sometimes this results from cooperative consultation with community members. At other times, the police use coercive threats, with the backing of a range of civil and regulatory laws, to engage third parties into taking some crime control responsibility. Our paper describes the dimensions of third party policing and identifies its prospects and challenges, including its implications for regulators.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent81157 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAustralian Institute of Criminologyen_US
dc.publisher.placeCanberraen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.aic.gov.au/publications/current%20series/rpp/41-60/rpp57.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom61en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto76en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalResearch and Public Policy Seriesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume57en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode390401en_US
dc.titleThird Party Policing: Prospects, challenges and implications for regulatorsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Criminology and Criminal Justiceen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2004 Australian Institute of Criminology. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version.en_AU
gro.date.issued2004
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record