Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMarchetti, Elenaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDaly, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.editorToni Makkaien_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:23:09Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:23:09Z
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.date.modified2010-08-09T07:17:56Z
dc.identifier.issn08178542en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/5041
dc.description.abstractIndigenous participation in sentencing procedures has been occurring informally in remote communities for some time. During the late 1990s, formalisation of this practice began in urban areas with the advent of Indigenous sentencing and Circle Courts. Formalisation has also occurred in remote areas. The aim has been to make court processes more culturally appropriate, to engender greater trust between Indigenous communities and judicial officers, and to permit a more informal and open exchange of information about defendants and their cases. Indigenous people, organisations, elders, family and kin group members are encouraged to participate in the sentencing process and to provide officials with insight into the offence, the character of victim-offender relations, and an offender's readiness to change. This paper describes the range of practices used in different states and territories. It is a snapshot of current practice at year-end 2003 in Australia. The authors' research suggests that judicial officers and other legal officials, elders, community people, paid workers and volunteers are working in a sincere and dedicated way to make these new justice practices meaningful and effective.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent467473 bytes
dc.format.extent34317 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherAustralian Institute of Criminologyen_US
dc.publisher.placeCanberraen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.aic.gov.au/publications/current%20series/tandi/261-280/tandi277.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto6en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue277en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalTrends and Issues in Crime and Justiceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume2004en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode390401en_US
dc.titleIndigenous courts and justice practices in Australiaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2004 Australian Institute of Criminology. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.en_AU
gro.date.issued2004
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record