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dc.contributor.authorDoropoulos, Christopheren_US
dc.contributor.authorWard, Selinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMarshell, Alyssaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDiaz-Pulido, Guillermoen_US
dc.contributor.authorMumby, Peter J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:43:53Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:43:53Z
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.issn1939-9170en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1890/12-0495.1en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/50802
dc.description.abstractNewly settled recruits typically suffer high mortality from disturbances, but rapid growth reduces their mortality once size-escape thresholds are attained. Ocean acidification (OA) reduces the growth of recruiting benthic invertebrates, yet no direct effects on survivorship have been demonstrated. We tested whether the reduced growth of coral recruits caused by OA would increase their mortality by prolonging their vulnerability to an acute disturbance: fish herbivory on surrounding algal turf. After two months' growth in ambient or elevated CO2 levels, the linear extension and calcification of coral (Acropora millepora) recruits decreased as CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) increased. When recruits were subjected to incidental fish grazing, their mortality was inversely size dependent. However, we also found an additive effect of pCO2 such that recruit mortality was higher under elevated pCO2 irrespective of size. Compared to ambient conditions, coral recruits needed to double their size at the highest pCO2 to escape incidental grazing mortality. This general trend was observed with three groups of predators (blenny, surgeonfish, and parrotfish), although the magnitude of the fish treatment varied among species. Our study demonstrates the importance of size-escape thresholds in early recruit survival and how OA can shift these thresholds, potentially intensifying population bottlenecks in benthic invertebrate recruitment.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent307357 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom2131en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto2138en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue10en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEcologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume93en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMarine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcological Impacts of Climate Changeen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060205en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050101en_US
dc.titleInteractions among chronic and acute impacts on coral recruits: the importance of size-escape thresholdsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2012 Ecological Society of America. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2015-06-12T05:02:08Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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