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dc.contributor.authorBillett, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarker, Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorHernon-Tinning, Bernieen_US
dc.contributor.editorWilfred Carren_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T09:10:30Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T09:10:30Z
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.date.modified2009-10-07T06:25:21Z
dc.identifier.issn14681366en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14681360400200198en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/5114
dc.description.abstractThis paper discusses workplace participatory practices -- the reciprocal process of engaging in and learning through work. The reciprocity between the affordance of the workplace (its invitational qualities) and individuals' engagement in the workplace is proposed as a means of understanding how learning through work proceeds. How workplaces invite individuals or cohorts of individuals to participate in and learn through work can be understood in terms of how they are afforded opportunities to engage in activities and interactions that are central to the values and practices (i.e. continuity) of the work practice. These affordances are shaped by workplace norms, practices and affiliations (e.g. cliques, associations, occupational groupings, employment status) and are often characterised by contestation and inequitable distribution. Access to opportunities for practice, and therefore learning, is directed towards sustaining the work practice and/or the interests of particular individuals and groups. Nevertheless, how individuals engage in and learn from work is also shaped by their agencies, which are a product of their values, subjectivities and identities. These reciprocal processes of participation in workplaces are illuminated through an analysis of the micro-social processes that shape the participatory practices of three workers over a six-month period -- a union worker, a grief counsellor and a school-based information technology consultant. The findings illuminate the bases for participation, performance and learning for each of the three workers.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent117343 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherTriangle Journals Ltden_US
dc.publisher.placeOxford, UKen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t716100719~db=allen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom233en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto257en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPedagogy, Culture and Societyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume12en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode330199en_US
dc.titleParticipatory practices at worken_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Education and Professional Studiesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2004 Taylor & Francis : The author manuscript version of this article will be available 18 months after publication. This journal is available online - use hypertext link.en_AU
gro.date.issued2004
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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