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dc.contributor.authorHourigan, D
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:07:04Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:07:04Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.modified2013-06-06T23:25:20Z
dc.identifier.issn1038-3441
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/51265
dc.description.abstractIn many a romantic vision of the state dominating the aggressive nature of human beings, the yolk of anarchy stirs. But in our postmodern era, such a vision commits itself to a fundamental legal-epistemological dilemma: once you know the law, you cannot go back to a ?no law' space. This has led some theorists to follow Robert Nozick in seeking the meagre assurances of private property and open markets to regulate in the absence of a state apparatus that is too conflict-ridden, too corrupt to be remedied. However, it is the view of this discussion that such a theoretical purview misses several crucial features of the psyche of the contemporary Australian law revealed by Lacanian psychoanalysis. The purpose of this discussion is to draw on the recent High Court of Australia appeal Lacey v Attorney-General of Queensland (2011) 242 CLR 573 and related materials to the end of proposing a commentary on a philosophico-psychoanalytic theory of law's relation to anarchy.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent318331 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherGriffith University
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.griffith.edu.au/criminology-law/griffith-law-review/previous-issues/volume-21-number-2
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom330
dc.relation.ispartofpageto348
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalGriffith Law Review
dc.relation.ispartofvolume21
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLegal Theory, Jurisprudence and Legal Interpretation
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode180122
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1801
dc.titlePostmodern Anarchy in the Modern Legal Psyche: Law, Anarchy and Psychoanalytic Philosophy
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciences
gro.rights.copyright© 2012 Griffith Law School. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHourigan, Daniel P.


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