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dc.contributor.authorHamilton-Craig, I
dc.contributor.authorKostner, KM
dc.contributor.authorWoodhouse, S
dc.contributor.authorColquhoun, D
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T16:03:14Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T16:03:14Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.modified2013-10-16T21:56:04Z
dc.identifier.issn1744-1595
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1744-1609.2012.00275.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/51325
dc.description.abstractBackground Fibrates have been prescribed for decades as 'broad-spectrum' lipid modifying agents that can improve plasma levels of triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, including very low- and intermediate-density lipoproteins. Fibrates are variably effective in lowering low-density cholesterol levels. Available fibrates include gemfibrozil, fenofibrate, bezafibrate, etiofibrate and ciprofobrate; only fenofibrate and gemfibrozil are available in Australia. Methods Members of the Queensland Lipid Group provided consensus grades of recommendations for the clinical use of fibrates based on PubMed searches, product information, and personal clinical experience. Results Fibrates are well tolerated, and the combination of fenofibrate with statins appears to be safer than gemfibrozil, particularly with regard to adverse effects on muscle. Evidence has been provided recently for the efficacy of fenofibrate in reducing microvascular complications in diabetic patients, including progression of retinopathy, progression of microalbuminuria and nephropathy, development of sensory neuropathy, and leg amputation. Macrovascular benefits appear to be confined to those with reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and/or increased triglyceride levels, and the relationship of microvascular benefits of fenofibrate to baseline lipid levels is variable and requires further assessment. Conclusions Indications for fibrate therapy may be extended in the future to include protection from both macro- and micro-vascular disease, particularly in diabetic patients and patients with residual dyslipidaemia in spite of statin therapy. We provide recommendations on the use of fibrates in clinical practice to highlight these potential indications.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent295018 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom181
dc.relation.ispartofpageto190
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare
dc.relation.ispartofvolume10
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3202
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4205
dc.titleUse of fibrates in clinical practice: Queensland Lipid Group consensus recommendations
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Medicine
gro.rights.copyright© 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd. This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. The definitive version is available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHamilton-Craig, Ian


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