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dc.contributor.authorElias, George P
dc.contributor.authorVarley, Matthew C
dc.contributor.authorWyckelsma, Victoria L
dc.contributor.authorMcKenna, Michael J
dc.contributor.authorMinahan, Clare L
dc.contributor.authorAughey, Robert J
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:42:52Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:42:52Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.modified2013-06-13T04:54:38Z
dc.identifier.issn1555-0265
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/51542
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The authors investigated the efficacy of a single exposure to 14 min of cold-water immersion (COLD) and contrast water therapy (CWT) on posttraining recovery in Australian football (AF). Method: Fourteen AF players participated in 3 wk of standardized training. After week 1 training, all players completed a passive recovery (PAS). During week 2, COLD or CWT was randomly assigned. Players undertook the opposing intervention in week 3. Repeat-sprint ability (6 נ20 m), countermovement and squat jumps, perceived muscle soreness, and fatigue were measured pretraining and over 48 h posttraining. Results: Immediately posttraining, groups exhibited similar performance and psychometric declines. At 24 h, repeat-sprint time had deteriorated by 4.1% for PAS and 1.0% for CWT but was fully restored by COLD (0.0%). At 24 and 48 h, both COLD and CWT attenuated changes in mean muscle soreness, with COLD (0.6 ᠰ.6 and 0.0 ᠰ.4) more effective than CWT (1.9 ᠰ.7 and 1.0 ᠰ.7) and PAS having minimal effect (5.5 ᠰ.6 and 4.0 ᠰ.5). Similarly, after 24 and 48 h, COLD and CWT both effectively reduced changes in perceived fatigue, with COLD (0.6 ᠰ.6 and 0.0 ᠰ.6) being more successful than CWT (0.8 ᠰ.6 and 0.7 ᠰ.6) and PAS having the smallest effect (2.2 ᠰ.8 and 2.4 ᠰ.6). Conclusions: AF training can result in prolonged physical and psychometric deficits persisting for up to 48 h. For restoring physical-performance and psychometric measures, COLD was more effective than CWT, with PAS being the least effective. Based on these results the authors recommend that 14 min of COLD be used after AF training. Keywords: hydrotherapy AFL, training, cold-water immersion, contrast water therapy
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherHuman Kinetics
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.publisher.urihttps://journals.humankinetics.com/view/journals/ijspp/7/4/article-p357.xml
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom357
dc.relation.ispartofpageto366
dc.relation.ispartofissue4
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
dc.relation.ispartofvolume7
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSports science and exercise
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSports science and exercise not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical physiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4207
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode420799
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3208
dc.titleEffects of Water Immersion on Posttraining Recovery in Australian footballers
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorMinahan, Clare L.


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