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dc.contributor.authorMcCallum, Hamish
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:37:41Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:37:41Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.modified2013-06-21T03:24:14Z
dc.identifier.issn0962-8436
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rstb.2012.0224
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/51779
dc.description.abstractInvading infectious diseases can, in theory, lead to the extinction of host populations, particularly if reservoir species are present or if disease transmission is frequency-dependent. The number of historic or prehistoric extinctions that can unequivocally be attributed to infectious disease is relatively small, but gathering firm evidence in retrospect is extremely difficult. Amphibian chytridiomycosis and Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) are two very different infectious diseases that are currently threatening to cause extinctions in Australia. These provide an unusual opportunity to investigate the processes of disease-induced extinction and possible management strategies. Both diseases are apparently recent in origin. Tasmanian DFTD is entirely host-specific but potentially able to cause extinction because transmission depends weakly, if at all, on host density. Amphibian chytridiomycosis has a broad host range but is highly pathogenic only to some populations of some species. At present, both diseases can only be managed by attempting to isolate individuals or populations from disease. Management options to accelerate the process of evolution of host resistance or tolerance are being investigated in both cases. Anthropogenic changes including movement of diseases and hosts, habitat destruction and fragmentation and climate change are likely to increase emerging disease threats to biodiversity and it is critical to further develop strategies to manage these threats.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherRoyal Society of London
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom2828
dc.relation.ispartofpageto2839
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPhilosophical Transactions of The Royal Society Biological Sciences
dc.relation.ispartofvolume367
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcological Applications not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPopulation Ecology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchVeterinary Epidemiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiological Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060207
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode070704
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode06
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.titleDisease and the dynamics of extinction
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorMcCallum, Hamish


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