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dc.contributor.authorBasset, Yves
dc.contributor.authorCizek, Lukas
dc.contributor.authorCuenoud, Philippe
dc.contributor.authorDidham, Raphael K
dc.contributor.authorGuilhaumon, Francois
dc.contributor.authorMissa, Olivier
dc.contributor.authorNovotny, Vojtech
dc.contributor.authorOdegaard, Frode
dc.contributor.authorRoslin, Tomas
dc.contributor.authorSchmidl, Juergen
dc.contributor.authorTishechkin, Alexey K
dc.contributor.authorWinchester, Neville N
dc.contributor.authorRoubik, David W
dc.contributor.authorAberlenc, Henri-Pierre
dc.contributor.authorBail, Johannes
dc.contributor.authorBarrios, Hector
dc.contributor.authorBridle, Jon R
dc.contributor.authorCastano-Meneses, Gabriela
dc.contributor.authorCorbara, Bruno
dc.contributor.authorCurletti, Gianfranco
dc.contributor.authorda Rocha, Wesley Duarte
dc.contributor.authorde Bakker, Domir
dc.contributor.authorDelabie, Jacques HC
dc.contributor.authorDejean, Alain
dc.contributor.authorFagan, Laura L
dc.contributor.authorFloren, Andreas
dc.contributor.authorKitching, Roger L
dc.contributor.authorMedianero, Enrique
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Scott E
dc.contributor.authorde Oliveira, Evandro Gama
dc.contributor.authorOrivel, Jerome
dc.contributor.authorPollet, Marc
dc.contributor.authorRapp, Mathieu
dc.contributor.authorRibeiro, Servio P
dc.contributor.authorRoisin, Yves
dc.contributor.authorSchmidt, Jesper B
dc.contributor.authorSorensen, Line
dc.contributor.authorLeponce, Maurice
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:13:19Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:13:19Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.issn0036-8075
dc.identifier.doi10.1126/science.1226727
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/52042
dc.description.abstractMost eukaryotic organisms are arthropods. Yet, their diversity in rich terrestrial ecosystems is still unknown. Here we produce tangible estimates of the total species richness of arthropods in a tropical rainforest. Using a comprehensive range of structured protocols, we sampled the phylogenetic breadth of arthropod taxa from the soil to the forest canopy in the San Lorenzo forest, Panama. We collected 6144 arthropod species from 0.48 hectare and extrapolated total species richness to larger areas on the basis of competing models. The whole 6000-hectare forest reserve most likely sustains 25,000 arthropod species. Notably, just 1 hectare of rainforest yields >60% of the arthropod biodiversity held in the wider landscape. Models based on plant diversity fitted the accumulated species richness of both herbivore and nonherbivore taxa exceptionally well. This lends credence to global estimates of arthropod biodiversity developed from plant models.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1481
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1484
dc.relation.ispartofjournalScience
dc.relation.ispartofvolume338
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchForestry Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode070599
dc.titleArthropod Diversity in a Tropical Forest
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.date.issued2014-10-10T00:59:55Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorKitching, Roger L.


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