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dc.contributor.convenorAndrew Beer
dc.contributor.authorBosman, Caryl
dc.contributor.editorCentre for Housing, Urban and Regional Planning
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-28T01:30:36Z
dc.date.available2018-03-28T01:30:36Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.modified2013-07-08T04:44:11Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://www.adelaide.edu.au/churp/ahrc12/
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/52233
dc.description.abstractIt is well established that Australia's ageing population will have a critical impact on the economy, the health care service and housing provision. The existing retirement village model is not adequate/appropriate for many boomers as they age and new 'village' models are currently being developed. The village idyll, an idealised residential landscape that encompasses both physical place and ideals of community, is at the core of most fully planned housing developments. This ideal underpins a new type of residential development, the Active Adult Lifestyle Community (AALC). AALCs have recently emerged on the Australian housing market in response to many boomers' calls for housing choice as they embark upon the 'retirement' phase of life. Although some boomers have indicated a desire to age in place not all intend to stay in the same house and most suburban landscapes are ill equipped to accommodate people as they age. AALCs are specifically designed to address the desires and needs of many boomers. The aims of this paper are to explore the impacts of these developments in South East Queensland (SEQ). The significance of this research lies in providing critical insights into the planning and provision of housing for Australia's aging population. To date research in this area has tended to focus on the needs of the 'older' old (80+), of those with special needs for care and support and for those with limited incomes. The literature identifies an urgent need for further research into housing needs, choices and preferences of baby boomers, as a unique and influential cohort, as they enter retirement and this paper addresses this need.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent1613389 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Adelaide
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.adelaide.edu.au/churp/ahrc12/
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename6th Australasian Housing Researchers’ Conference
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitle6th Australasian Housing Researchers’ Conference
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2012-02-08
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2012-02-10
dc.relation.ispartoflocationAdelaide
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchUrban Analysis and Development
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode120507
dc.titleGerotopia: Building (retirement) villages for baby boomers
dc.typeConference output
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conferences
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publications
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2012. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this conference please refer to the conference’s website or contact the author.
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBosman, Caryl J.


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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