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dc.contributor.convenorTrevor Budge
dc.contributor.authorLow Choy, Darryl
dc.contributor.authorJones, David
dc.contributor.editorA. Butt & M. Kennedy
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:36:02Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:36:02Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.modified2013-07-08T04:40:25Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://anzaps.net/2012-conference-bendigo/
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/52307
dc.description.abstractIncreasingly planning practice and research are having to engage with Indigenous communities in Australia to empower and position their knowledge in planning strategies and arguments. But also to act as articulators of their cultural knowledge, landscape aspirations and responsibilities and the need to ensure that they are directly consulted in projects that impact upon their 'country' generally and specifically. This need has changed rapidly over the last 25 years because of land title claim legal precedents, state and Commonwealth legislative changes, and policy shifts to address reconciliation and the consequences of the fore-going precedents and enactments. While planning instruments and their policies have shifted, as well as research grant expectations and obligations, many of these Western protocols do not recognise and sympathetically deal with the cultural and practical realities of Indigenous community management dynamics, consultation practices and procedures, and cultural events much of which are placing considerable strain upon communities who do not have the human and financial resources to manage, respond, co-operate and inform in the same manner expected of non-Indigenous communities in Australia. This paper reviews several planning formal research, contract research and educational engagements and case studies between the authors and various Indigenous communities, and highlights key issues, myths and flaws in the way Western planning and research expectations are imposed upon Indigenous communities that often thwart the quality and uncertainty of planning outcomes for which the clients, research agencies, and government entities were seeking to create.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent847674 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherCommunity Planning and Development Program, La Trobe University
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.publisher.urihttp://anzaps.net/2012-conference-bendigo/
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameANZAPS 2012
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleProceedings of the Australia & New Zealand Association of Planning Schools Conference
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2012-09-21
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2012-09-23
dc.relation.ispartoflocationBendigo, Australia
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchUrban and Regional Planning not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode120599
dc.titlePlanning Research and Educational Partnerships with Indigenous Communities: Practice, Realties and Lessons
dc.typeConference output
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conferences
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publications
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.rights.copyright© 2012 Community Planning and Development Program. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the conference's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorLow Choy, Darryl C.


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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