Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorYang, Yu Rong
dc.contributor.authorClements, Archie A.
dc.contributor.authorGray, Darren
dc.contributor.authorAtkinson, Jo-An
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Gail M.
dc.contributor.authorBarnes, Tamsin
dc.contributor.authorMcManus, Donald
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-10T00:48:48Z
dc.date.available2017-08-10T00:48:48Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.modified2013-08-28T22:05:32Z
dc.identifier.issn17563305
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1756-3305-5-146
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/52742
dc.description.abstractEchinococcus transmission is known to be affected by various environmental factors, which may be modified by human influence or natural events including global warming. Considerable population growth in the last fifty years in Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region (NHAR), the People's Republic of China (PRC), has led to dramatic increases in deforestation and modified agricultural practices. In turn, this has resulted in many changes in the habitats for the definitive and intermediate hosts of both Echinococcus granulosus and E. multilocularis, which have increased the risks for transmission of both parasites, affecting echinococcosis prevalence and human disease. Ecological environmental changes due to anthropogenic activities and natural events drive Echinococcus transmission and NHAR provides a notable example illustrating how human activity can impact on a parasitic infection of major public health significance. It is very important to continually monitor these environmental (including climatic) factors that drive the distribution of Echinococcus spp. and their impact on transmission to humans because such information is necessary to formulate reliable future public health policy for echinococcosis control programs and to prevent disease spread.
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom146-1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto146-9
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalParasites & Vectors
dc.relation.ispartofvolume5
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical Microbiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1108
dc.titleImpact of anthropogenic and natural environmental changes on Echinococcus transmission in Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, the People's Republic of China
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC2 - Articles (Other)
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0
dc.description.versionVersion of Record (VoR)
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Public Health
gro.rights.copyright© Yang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2012. This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorYang, Yu Rong R.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record