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dc.contributor.authorZhao, HJ
dc.contributor.authorJiang, DL
dc.contributor.authorZhang, SQ
dc.contributor.authorCatterall, K
dc.contributor.authorJohn, R
dc.contributor.editorRoyce W. Murray
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:43:10Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:43:10Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.issn0003-2700
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/ac0302298
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/5278
dc.description.abstractA novel rapid methodology for the determination of chemical oxygen demand (COD) based on photoelectrochemical oxidative degradation principle (PECOD) was proposed and experimentally validated. With this new method, the extent of degradation of dissolved organic matter in a water sample is measured simply by directly quantifying the extent of electron transfer at a TiO2 nanoporous film electrode during an exhaustive photoelectrocatalytic degradation of organic matter in a thin layer photoelectrochemical cell. The PECOD method demonstrated in this work is a direct and absolute method. It does not require the use of standard for calibration. The method, in principle, measures the theoretical COD value due to the extraordinary high oxidation efficiency and accuracy of charge measurement. This new approach overcomes many of the current problems associated with existing oxygen demand techniques (e.g., the matrix effect, one of the serious practical problems that most rapid COD methods suffered because of the insufficient oxidation efficiency). The PECOD method overcomes the matrix effect by employing a highly effective photoelectrochemical system that is capable of fully oxidizing a wide spectrum of organics in the water sample. The method was successfully applied to determine the COD of a range of synthetic and real samples. Excellent agreement with a standard dichromate method was achieved. The practical detection limit of 0.2 mg L-1 COD with the linear range of 0-200 mg L-1 was also achieved. The PECOD method is a method that is environmentally friendly, robust, rapid, and easily automated. It requires only 1-5 min to complete an assay and consumes very limited reagent (electrolyte only).
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society
dc.publisher.placeWashington DC, USA
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom155
dc.relation.ispartofpageto160
dc.relation.ispartofeditionJanuary 1, 2004
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAnalytical Chemistry
dc.relation.ispartofvolume76
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAnalytical Chemistry
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOther Chemical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0301
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0399
dc.titleDevelopment of a Direct Photoelectrochemical Method for Determination of Chemical Oxygen Demand
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.rights.copyrightSelf-archiving of the author-manuscript version is not yet supported by this journal. Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version or contact the author[s] for more information.
gro.date.issued2015-02-06T01:36:41Z
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorZhao, Huijun
gro.griffith.authorZhang, Shanqing
gro.griffith.authorJiang, Dianlu
gro.griffith.authorJohn, Richard
gro.griffith.authorCatterall, Kylie P.


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