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dc.contributor.authorM. Masser, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorM. White, Katherineen_US
dc.contributor.authorK. Hyde, Melissaen_US
dc.contributor.authorJ. Terry, Deborahen_US
dc.contributor.authorG. Robinson, Natalieen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:02:50Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:02:50Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.date.modified2013-10-02T23:30:17Z
dc.identifier.issn1537-2995en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1537-2995.2008.01981.xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/52802
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Donor retention poses a significant problem to blood collection agencies around the world. Previous research using an augmented theory of planned behavior (TPB) approach has demonstrated that attitude, subjective norm, self-efficacy, moral norm, anticipated regret, donation anxiety from prior blood donations, and self-identity as a blood donor predicts experienced donors' intentions and that intentions, self-efficacy, moral norm, and anticipated regret may impact upon people's actual blood donation behavior. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Established blood donors (n = 263) completed questionnaires assessing standard TPB constructs, anticipated regret, moral norm, donation anxiety, and self-identity as a blood donor. Three months later, a second questionnaire assessing blood donation behavior in the intervening 3 months was mailed and returned by 182 donors. RESULTS: With structural equation modeling, the final augmented TPB model provided an excellent fit to the data and included a direct path from intention to behavior and indirect paths to behavior through intention for attitude, self-efficacy, and anticipated regret. Moral norm, donation anxiety, and donor identity indirectly predicted intention through attitude. In total, 51 percent of the variance in donors' attitudes, 86 percent of variance in donors' intentions, and 70 percent of the variance in donors' behavior were accounted for in the final model. CONCLUSION: An augmented TPB framework proved efficacious in determining the predictors of the intentions and behavior of established blood donors. Further, this framework highlighted the importance of considering in the future how donors' motivations for donating blood may evolve as a function of the number of prior donations.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent132200 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishingen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom320en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto329en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalTransfusionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume49en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchHealth, Clinical and Counselling Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode170106en_US
dc.titlePredicting blood donation intentions and behavior among Australian blood donors: testing an extended theory of planned behavior modelen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2009 AABB. This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. The definitive version is available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/en_US
gro.date.issued2009
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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