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dc.contributor.authorAhmed, F
dc.contributor.authorKhan, MR
dc.contributor.authorAkhtaruzzaman, M
dc.contributor.authorKarim, R
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, G
dc.contributor.authorBanu, CP
dc.contributor.authorNahar, B
dc.contributor.authorDarnton-Hill, I
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T16:04:44Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T16:04:44Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.modified2013-08-29T22:10:38Z
dc.identifier.issn0007-1145
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0007114511006908
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/52825
dc.description.abstractThe present study examined whether long-term supplementation with once- and twice-weekly multiple micronutrients (MMN-1 and MMN-2) can improve Hb and micronutrient status more than twice-weekly Fe-folic acid (IFA-2) supplementation in non-anaemic adolescent girls in Bangladesh. An equal number of 324 rural schoolgirls aged 11-17 years were given MMN-1 or MMN-2 or IFA-2 supplements for 52 weeks in a randomised, double-blind trial. Blood samples were collected at baseline, and at 26 and 52 weeks of supplementation. The girls receiving IFA-2 supplements were more likely to be anaemic than the girls receiving MMN-2 supplements for 26 weeks (OR 5籬 95% CI 1糬 19絻 P찷018). All three supplements reduced Fe deficiency effectively. Both the MMN-1 and MMN-2 groups showed significantly greater improvements in vitamins A, B2 and C status than the girls in the IFA-2 group, as might be expected. Receiving a MMN-1 supplement was found to be less effective than MMN-2 supplement in improving Fe, vitamins A, B2 and folic acid status. Receiving micronutrient supplements beyond 26 weeks showed little additional benefit in improving micronutrient status. In conclusion, given twice-weekly for 26 weeks, MMN supplements can improve micronutrient status effectively with no significant increase in Hb concentration compared with IFA supplements in non-anaemic Bangladeshi adolescent girls. However, it significantly reduces the risk of anaemia. Before any recommendations can be made, further research, including into cost-effectiveness, is needed to see whether MMN supplementation has any additional longer-term health benefits over that of IFA supplementation in this population.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1484
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1493
dc.relation.ispartofissue8
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
dc.relation.ispartofvolume108
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAnimal production
dc.subject.fieldofresearchFood sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNutrition and dietetics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic health nutrition
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3003
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3006
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3210
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode321005
dc.titleEffect of long-term intermittent supplementation with multiple micronutrients compared with iron-and-folic acid supplementation on Hb and micronutrient status of non-anaemic adolescent schoolgirls in rural Bangladesh
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorAhmed, Faruk


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