Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDahles, Heidi
dc.contributor.authorHorst, John ter
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T16:12:09Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T16:12:09Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.modified2013-10-20T23:10:06Z
dc.identifier.issn17527554
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00472336.2012.668349
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/52894
dc.description.abstractThe Cambodian silk weaving industry shows a remarkable pattern of ethnicised positions interlocked in processes of production and trade stretching beyond Cambodia into the Southeast Asian region and into Europe and the United States. Key commercial positions in the Cambodian silk trading networks are dominated by the Chinese, at least so it seems. In contrast to the bulk of literature on Chinese capitalism, the current study addresses a situation in which the commercial positions are identified as Chinese regardless of the ethnic background of the people who occupy them. While subscribing to the institutional perspective on Chinese capitalism, this article aims to take the debate one step further by arguing that - while a particular institutional embedding is conducive to Chinese proliferation in the business sector - Chinese business practices and representations are themselves subject to processes of institutionalisation. The paper explains how they may develop into an institution that is both a model of and for conducting business.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent274064 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom210
dc.relation.ispartofpageto229
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Contemporary Asia
dc.relation.ispartofvolume42
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEntrepreneurship
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode150304
dc.titleInstitutionalising Chineseness: Legacies of Chinese Commercial Hegemony in the Cambodian Silk Industry
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2012 Taylor & Francis. This is an electronic version of an article published in the Journal of Contemporary Asia, Volume 42, Issue 2, 2012, pp. 210-229. The Journal of Contemporary Asia is available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com with the open URL of your article.
gro.date.issued2012
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorSchnetzinger, Heidi


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record