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dc.contributor.authorA. Rowe, Patriciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorA. Boyce, Rosalieen_US
dc.contributor.authorBoyle, Mareeen_US
dc.contributor.authorO'Reilly, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.editorJohn Wanna and Patrick Bishopen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T11:42:54Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T11:42:54Z
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.date.modified2009-10-09T06:10:07Z
dc.identifier.issn03136647en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-8500.2004.00375.xen_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/5313
dc.description.abstractThis article examines the development of two distinct models of organising allied health professionals within two public sector health service organisations in Australia. The first case illustrated a mode of organising that facilitated a culture that focused on asset protection and whose external orientation was threat oriented because its disparate multiple identities operated as a fractured, fragmented and competitive set of profession disciplines. In this milieu, there was no evidence of entrepreneurial approaches being used. In contrast, the second case study illustrated a mode of organising that facilitated an entrepreneurial culture that focused on asset growth and an external orientation that was opportunity oriented because of the evolution of a strong superordinate allied health identity that operated as a single united health services stakeholder. This evolution was coupled with the emergence of a corporate boardroom model of management that is consonant with Savage et al. (1997) IDS/N model of management. Once this structure and strategy were in place, corporate entrepreneur ship became the modus operandi. Consequently, because the case study was a situation where corporate entrepreneurship existed in the public sector, it was possible to compare the factors that stimulate corporate entrepreneurship in Sadler's (2000) study with factors that were observed in our study.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Asiaen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118512012/homeen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom16en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto30en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAustralian Journal of Public Administrationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume63en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode350299en_US
dc.titleA comparative analysis of entrepreneurial approaches within public healthcare organisationsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing. The definitive version is available at [www.blackwell-synergy.com.]en_AU
gro.date.issued2004
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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