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dc.contributor.authorHayes, Sharonen_US
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Hennesseyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:42:23Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:42:23Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.date.modified2013-10-16T22:18:56Z
dc.identifier.issn14456230en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/53182
dc.description.abstractRestorative justice is firmly established in Australian juvenile justice. While the official language used to describe restorative initiatives varies across states and territories, the most common form is a meeting or conference between young offenders and their victims (most commonly known as a family group or youth justice conference). During the past decade, an impressive amount of empirical research has examined how the restorative justice process affects offenders, victims and other participants (such as supporters for young offenders and victims). Results from this line of research are remarkably consistent and show that participants generally regard restorative conferences as procedurally fair and that they are satisfied with the outcomes (eg what young offenders agree to do to make up for their offending behaviour, such as offer a sincere apology or perform work for the victim or the community). What is less common, however, is the perception among participants that restorative conferences achieve the key aim of restoration.By 'restoration' we refer to encounters where 'offenders apologise, their apologies are accepted, victims offer forgiveness,and conferences conclude with a feeling of mutual good will'.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent140072 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherQueensland University of Technologyen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttps://lr.law.qut.edu.au/article/view/49en_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom380en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto391en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalQueensland University of Technology Law and Justice Journalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume8en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLaw and Legal Studies not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode189999en_US
dc.titleDeveloping ethical identities in young offenders through restorative justice practice in Australiaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/en_US
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2008. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
gro.date.issued2008
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHayes, Hennessey D.


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