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dc.contributor.authorCurran, Giorelen_US
dc.contributor.editorDavid Cesaranien_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:02:34Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:02:34Z
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.date.modified2009-01-12T06:23:00Z
dc.identifier.issn0031322Xen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/0031322032000185578en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/5382
dc.description.abstractCurran examines the political legacy of far-right neo-populist parties in Australia and Italy. She argues that assessments of their 'success' need to extend beyond the electoral decline or organizational implosion of the parties themselves. An important measure of their impact is the influence they have exerted on mainstream political discourse and styles of communication. That they have been successful in having such an impact is well illustrated in the politically expedient adoption of race-conscious, anti-immigration and anti-asylum policies in Australia and Italy. Curran examines the influence of Pauline Hanson's One Nation party and Umberto Bossi's Lega Nord (Northern League) on the mainstreaming of populist discourse in these two countries. She focuses on some of the populist themes and styles embraced by the Australian political leader John Howard and his Italian counterpart Silvio Berlusconi, and she concludes that, regardless of their political fragility or outright demise, these far-right neo-populist parties have been successful in injecting populist themes and prejudices into the mainstream political discourse in their respective countries.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherRoutledge, Taylor and Francis Groupen_US
dc.publisher.placeLondonen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content?content=10.1080/0031322032000185578en_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom37en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto55en_US
dc.relation.ispartofedition2004en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPatterns of Prejudiceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume38en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode360102en_US
dc.titleMainstreaming populist discourse: the race-conscious legacy of neo-populist parties in Australia and Italyen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, School of Government and International Relationsen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2004 Taylor & Francis : The author-version of this article will be available for download [12-18 months] after publication : Use hypertext link to access the version of the publisher.en_AU
gro.date.issued2004
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text


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