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dc.contributor.authorSalamone, I
dc.contributor.authorGovindarajulu, R
dc.contributor.authorFalk, S
dc.contributor.authorParks, M
dc.contributor.authorListon, A
dc.contributor.authorAshman, TL
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T16:08:00Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T16:08:00Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.modified2013-11-11T22:11:57Z
dc.identifier.issn0002-9122
dc.identifier.doi10.3732/ajb.1200624
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/54149
dc.description.abstract堐remise of the Study: Hybrid zones provide "natural laboratories" for understanding the processes of selection, reinforcement, and speciation. We sought to gain insight into the degree of introgression and the extent of ecological-phenotypic intermediacy in the natural hybrid strawberry, Fragaria נananassa subsp. cuneifolia. 堍ethods: We used whole-plastome sequencing to identify parental species-specific (Fragaria chiloensis and F. virginiana) chloroplast single-nucleotide polymorphisms and combined the use of these with nuclear microsatellite markers to genetically characterize the hybrid zone. We assessed the potential role of selection in the observed geographic patterns by bioclimatically characterizing the niche of the hybrid populations and phenotypically characterizing hybrid individuals of known genomic constitution. 堋ey Results: Significant admixture and little overall maternal bias in chloroplast or nuclear genomes suggest a high degree of interfertility among the parental and hybrid species and point to a long history of backcrossing and genetic mixing in the hybrid zone. Even though hybrids were phenotypically intermediate to the parental species, there was a discernible fingerprint of the parental genotype within hybrid individuals. Thus, although the pattern of introgression observed suggests geographic limitations to gene flow, it may be reinforced by selection for specific parental traits in the bioclimatically intermediate habitat occupied by the hybrid. 堃onclusions: This work uncovered the genetic complexity underlying the hybrid zone of the wild relatives of the cultivated strawberry. It lays the foundation for experimental dissection of the causes of genomic introgression and nuclear-cytoplasmic disassociation, and for understanding other parts of Fragaria evolutionary history.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherBotanical Society of America
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom939
dc.relation.ispartofpageto950
dc.relation.ispartofissue5
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAmerican Journal of Botany
dc.relation.ispartofvolume100
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPlant Systematics and Taxonomy
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSpeciation and Extinction
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEvolutionary Biology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPlant Biology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060310
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060311
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0603
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0607
dc.titleBioclimatic, ecological, and phenotypic intermediacy and high genetic admixture in a natural hybrid of octoploid strawberries
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorParks, Matthew


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