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dc.contributor.authorFullagar, Simoneen_US
dc.contributor.editorBondan Jungen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:22:59Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:22:59Z
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.date.modified2009-11-18T05:31:23Z
dc.identifier.issn1607-8055en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/5431
dc.description.abstractThis article draws upon Foucaultճ (1988; 1990; 1997) later work on ethics and subjectivity to consider Socrateճ timeless question Ԩow are we to live?ծ In this way philosophy and leisure practices can be brought together to problematise and open up different ways of thinking about the nature of everyday freedom. Specifically, a case study of an Australian community garden project (Northey Street City Farm) outlines the transformative potential of leisure practices that are produced through emerging political formations and urban public spaces. Drawing upon a governmentality perspective (Dean, 1999; Rose, 1999) leisure is conceptualised as an etho-political practice of freedom that constitutes the self, and is constituted through, the complex discursive formations of advanced liberalism. As a public space Northey Street invites, and incites, participants to constitute themselves in particular ways as ethical subjects through leisure practices and power relations. This article adopts a deconstructive approach as it reconsiders certain assumptions about subjectivity and freedom that have informed leisure theor y through a focus on the parameters of ԡctivity, time, space and experienceծ An etho-politics of leisure can open up alternate ways of thinking about the particular relationships between power and freedom that shape contemporary forms of subjectivity and social engagement.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.format.extent76324 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.publisher.placeCanadaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.worldleisure.org/about/publications/world_leisure_journal/print_version.phpen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom14en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto22en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalWorld Leisure Journalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume46en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode370199en_US
dc.titlePost-structuralist philosophies: Towards an etho-politics of everyday leisure practicesen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Department of Tourism, Sport and Hotel Managementen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2004. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owners for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted.For information about this conference please refer to the publisher's website or contact the authorsen_AU
gro.date.issued2004
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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