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dc.contributor.authorRae, Kirstyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:02:36Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:02:36Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.issn1445954Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/54839
dc.description.abstractAbstract This study examines factors that affect an employee's level of job satisfaction. Understanding job satisfaction is important because it has implications for positive or negative workplace outcomes. This study examines the main effect of the association between a manager's level of psychological empowerment, organisational commitment and job satisfaction, and the interaction effect of these associations moderated by the level of the manager's position within the organisation. Specifically, the managerial employee's level of job satisfaction is examined because managerial perceptions may have flow-down effects throughout an organisation. A sample of 301 Australian chief financial officers, human resource managers and chief executive officers was surveyed. The results of the regression analyses revealed partial support for the main effects of the associations between managers' perceptions of organisational commitment, psychological empowerment and job satisfaction, as well as how the association is moderated by managerial level. The findings of the study show that chief executive officers and human resource managers sought autonomy to have job satisfaction, while all three managerial levels sought affective commitment to be able to experience job satisfaction. Keywords: affective commitment, job satisfaction, managerial, organisational commitment, psychological empowermenten_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent314270 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherGriffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.griffith.edu.au/business-government/accounting-accountability-performance-journal/previous-issuesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom35en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto62en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAccounting, Accountability and Performanceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume18en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchManagement Accountingen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode150105en_US
dc.titleHow perceptions of empowerment and commitment affect job satisfaction: a study of managerial-level effectsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Business School, Department of Accounting, Finance and Economicsen_US
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2013 and IDEA. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. It is posted here with permission of the copyright owner[s] for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this journal please refer to the journal’s website or contact the author[s].en_US
gro.date.issued2015-04-28T23:02:51Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorRae, Kirsty N.


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