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dc.contributor.authorHwang, Yoon-Suk.
dc.contributor.authorEvans, David
dc.contributor.authorMackenzie, Jim
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T16:01:36Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T16:01:36Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.date.modified2013-12-18T22:34:08Z
dc.identifier.issn18331882
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/55111
dc.description.abstractTheory-of-Mind has been defined as the ability to explain and predict human behaviour by imputing mental states, such as attention, intention, desire, emotion, perception and belief, to the self and others (Astington & Barriault, 2001). Theory-of-Mind study began with Piaget and continued through a tradition of meta-cognitive research projects (Flavell, 2004). A study by Baron-Cohen, Leslie and Frith (1985) of Theory-of-Mind abilities in atypically developing children reported major difficulties experienced by children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in imputing mental states to others. Since then, a wide range of follow-up research has been conducted to confirm these results. Traditional Theory-of-Mind research on ASD has been based on an either-or assumption that Theory-of-Mind is something one either possesses or does not. However, this approach fails to take account of how the ASD population themselves experience Theory-of-Mind. This paper suggests an alternative approach, Theory-of-Mind continuum model, to understand the Theory-of-Mind experience of people with ASD. The Theory-of-Mind continuum model will be developed through a comparison of subjective and objective aspects of mind, and phenomenal and psychological concepts of mind. This paper will demonstrate the importance of balancing qualitative and quantitative research methods in investigating the minds of people with ASD. It will enrich our theoretical understanding of Theory-of-Mind, as well as contain methodological implications for further studies in Theory-of-Mind.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent378723 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherCommon Ground
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.publisher.urihttps://doi.org/10.18848/1833-1882/CGP/v02i03/52304
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom249
dc.relation.ispartofpageto258
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Interdisciplinary Social Science
dc.relation.ispartofvolume2
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSpecial Education and Disability
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMarketing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSocial Work
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSociology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode130312
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1505
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1607
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1608
dc.titleTheory-of-Mind Continuum Model: Why Mind Matters in Philosophy, Psychology and Education
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2007. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this journal please refer to the journal’s website or contact the author[s].
gro.date.issued2007
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHwang, Yoon-Suk


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