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dc.contributor.authorChambers, Suzanne K
dc.contributor.authorSchover, Leslie
dc.contributor.authorNielsen, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorHalford, Kim
dc.contributor.authorClutton, Samantha
dc.contributor.authorGardiner, Robert A
dc.contributor.authorDunn, Jeff
dc.contributor.authorOcchipinti, Stefano
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-27T01:30:27Z
dc.date.available2017-07-27T01:30:27Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.modified2014-01-09T22:48:33Z
dc.identifier.issn0941-4355
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00520-013-1868-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/55433
dc.description.abstractBackground The experience of the diagnosis of prostate cancer is distressing for both men and their partners. The present study describes the prevalence of psychological distress in men with prostate cancer and their partners, and the predictors of adjustment outcomes. Methods/design A cross-sectional survey of 189 prostate cancer patients who were scheduled for or had undergone surgery for localised prostate cancer and their partners assessed socio-demographic variables, masculine selfesteem and social intimacy, psychological adjustment and quality of life. Results Overall, patients and partners reported low distress; however, female partners were more anxious with 36 % reporting mild to severe anxiety. For men, masculine selfesteem and time since diagnosis were most strongly related to mental health status; urinary bother most influenced physical quality of life. For female partners, the man's psychological distress and his sexual bother were most strongly related to her mental health status; higher social intimacy was most strongly associated with physical quality of life. Conclusion The correlates of distress after the diagnosis of prostate cancer differ between patients and female partners. For men, masculine self-esteem may be most crucial, whereas for women, her partner's level of distress may matter most. Research to better understand these interactions is needed.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.publisher.placeGermany
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom2967
dc.relation.ispartofpageto2976
dc.relation.ispartofissue11
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSupportive Care in Cancer
dc.relation.ispartofvolume21
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode179999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode17
dc.titleCouple distress after localised prostate cancer
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychology
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorOcchipinti, Stefano
gro.griffith.authorChambers, Suzanne K.
gro.griffith.authorDunn, Jeffrey


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