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dc.contributor.authorSabapathy, Surendranen_US
dc.contributor.authorKingsley, Rebeccaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, Donalden_US
dc.contributor.authorAdams, Lewisen_US
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Normanen_US
dc.contributor.editorJ. A. Wedzichaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:17:46Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:17:46Z
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.issn00406376en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/thx.2004.026617en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/5549
dc.description.abstractBackground: While the acute physiological responses to continuous exercise have been well documented in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), no previous study has examined the response to intermittent exercise in these patients. Methods: We examined the physiological responses of 10 individuals with moderate COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 second 52 (15)% predicted) who performed both an intermittent (1 min exercise and rest intervals) and a continuous cycle ergometer test on separate days. Both intermittent and continuous exercise tests were performed at the same power output, calculated as 70% of the peak power attained during an incremental exercise test. Results: Intermittent exercise was associated with significantly lower values for oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide output, expired ventilation, heart rate, plasma lactate concentration, and ratings of breathlessness than continuous exercise. Subjects were able to complete a significantly greater total amount of work during intermittent exercise (71 (32) kJ) than during continuous exercise (31 (24) kJ). The degree of dynamic lung hyperinflation (change in end expiratory lung volume) was significantly lower during intermittent exercise (0.23 (0.07) l) than in continuous exercise (0.52 (0.13) l). Conclusions: The greater amount of work performed and lower measured physiological responses achieved with intermittent exercise may allow for greater peripheral training adaptations in individuals with more limited lung function. The results suggest that intermittent exercise may be superior to continuous exercise as a mode of training for patients with COPD.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent357085 bytes
dc.format.extent37741 bytes
dc.format.extent37741 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1026en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1031en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue12en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalThoraxen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume59en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode321027en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode321401en_US
dc.titleContinuous and intermittent exercise responses in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseaseen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright remains with the authors 2004. The attached file is posted here with permission of the copyright owners for your personal use only. No further distribution permitted. For information about this journal please refer to the publisher’s website or contact the authors.en_US
gro.date.issued2015-05-13T03:18:14Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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