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dc.contributor.authorHyde, Melissa K
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Katherine M
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:02:55Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:02:55Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.modified2014-05-13T05:41:48Z
dc.identifier.issn0887-0446
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/08870446.2012.731060
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/55845
dc.description.abstractPeople's decision to join an organ donor registry and have a discussion with family about their organ donation preference increases the likelihood that their family will consent to donation of their organs. This study explores the effectiveness of three interventions compared to a control condition to increase individual consent (registering and discussing donation wishes) for organ donation. Australian residents who had not previously communicated their consent (N = 177) were randomly allocated to complete an online survey representing either an extended theory of planned behaviour motivational intervention (strengthening intention via attitudes, subjective norms, control, moral norms and identity), a volitional intervention using constructs from the health action process approach (strengthening the translation of intentions into action using action plans and coping plans), a combined motivational and volitional intervention, or a control condition. Registering, but not discussing, intentions increased in the motivational compared to non-motivational conditions. For joining the organ donor registry, the combination of strengthening intentions (motivational) as well as forming specific action (when, where, how, and with whom for discussing) and coping (listing potential obstacles and how these may be overcome) plans (volitional) resulted in significantly higher rates of self-reported behaviour. There was no evidence for this effect on discussion.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent418900 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom399
dc.relation.ispartofpageto417
dc.relation.ispartofissue4
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPsychology & Health
dc.relation.ispartofvolume28
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCurriculum and pedagogy
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3901
dc.titleA test of three interventions to promote people's communication of their consent for organ donation
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Applied Psychology
gro.rights.copyright© 2013 Routledge. This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.Please refer to the journal link for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHyde, Melissa K.


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