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dc.contributor.authorFinch, Caroline F
dc.contributor.authorDiamantopoulou, Kathy
dc.contributor.authorTwomey, Dara M
dc.contributor.authorDoyle, Tim LA
dc.contributor.authorLloyd, David G
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Warren
dc.contributor.authorElliott, Bruce C
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-14T12:31:06Z
dc.date.available2017-08-14T12:31:06Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.date.modified2014-01-20T04:55:21Z
dc.identifier.issn0306-3674
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bjsports-2012-091797
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/55889
dc.description.abstractObjective To determine the reach and adoption of a coach-led exercise training programme for lower limb injury prevention. Design Secondary analysis of data from a groupclustered randomised controlled trial. Setting A periodised exercise training warm-up programme was delivered to players during training sessions over an 8-week preseason (weeks 1-8) and 18-week playing season. Participants 1564 community Australian football players. Main outcome measurements Reach, measured weekly, was the number of players who attended training sessions. Adoption was the number of attending players who completed the programme in full, partially or not at all. Reasons for partial or non-participation were recorded. Results In week 1, 599 players entered the programme; 55% attended 1 training session and 45% attended > 1 session. By week 12, 1540 players were recruited but training attendance (reach) decreased to <50%. When players attended training, the majority adopted the full programme-ranging from 96% (week 1) to above 80% until week 20. The most common reasons for low adoption were players being injured, too sore, being late for training or choosing their own warm-up. Conclusions The training programme's reach was highest preseason and halved at the playing season's end. However, when players attended training sessions, their adoption was high and remained close to 70% by season end. For sports injury prevention programmes to be fully effective across a season, attention also needs to be given to (1) encouraging players to attend formal training sessions and (2) considering the possibility of some form of programme delivery outside of formal training.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent687249 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherBMJ Group
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom718
dc.relation.ispartofpageto723
dc.relation.ispartofissue8
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicine
dc.relation.ispartofvolume48
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSports Medicine
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEngineering
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEducation
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110604
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode09
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode11
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode13
dc.titleThe reach and adoption of a coach-led exercise training programme in community football
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2013. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this journal please refer to the journal’s website or contact the authors.
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorLloyd, David
gro.griffith.authorDoyle, Tim L.


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