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dc.contributor.authorBoyer, Honorineen_US
dc.contributor.authorCock, Ianen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:28:46Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:28:46Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.date.modified2014-01-22T23:25:15Z
dc.identifier.issn22490159en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/55980
dc.description.abstractBackground: Macadamia integriflora (family Proteaceae) is an endemic Australian plant traditionally used by Australian Aborigines as a food. Its nuts are known to keep well, raising the possibility that they may contain antimicrobial compounds and therefore may have value as a functional food to retard spoilage and prevent food poisoning, as well as potential medicinal antibiotic uses. Methods: The antimicrobial activity of M. integriflora was investigated by disc diffusion assays against a panel of bacteria and fungi. Toxicity was determined using the Artemia franciscana nauplii bioassay. Results: All M. integriflora extracts displayed antimicrobial activity in the disc diffusion assay. The flower methanol extract had the broadest specificity, inhibiting the growth of 7 of the 14 bacteria tested (50 %) and all 3 (100 %) of the fungi tested. All other extracts inhibited the growth of 6 (42.9 %) of the bacterial species tested and up to 2 (66.6 %) of the fungi tested. All extracts were more effective at inhibiting the growth of Gram-negative bacteria than Gram-positive bacteria. Indeed, only the flower methanol extract was capable of inhibiting the growth of any of the Gram-positive bacteria, inhibiting the growth of only 1 (B. cereus) of the 4 Gram-positive bacteria tested (25%). All M. integriflora extracts were non-toxic in the Artemia franciscana bioassay, with no significant increase in mortality induction above that of the negative control. Conclusions: The lack of toxicity of the M. integriflora extracts and their inhibitory bioactivity against a panel of bacteria and fungi demonstrate their potential as food additives to inhibit bacterial spoilage and food borne illnesses without the need for chemical preservative additives. Furthermore, M. integriflora extracts also have promise as antimicrobial agents for medicinal purposes.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent1917907 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherPharmacognosy Network Worldwideen_US
dc.publisher.placeIndiaen_US
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.phcogcommn.org/content/past-issuesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom53en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto62en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue3en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPharmacognosy Communicationsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume3en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPlant Biology not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060799en_US
dc.titleEvaluation of the potential of Macadamia integriflora extracts as antibacterial food agentsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environmenten_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2013 Phcog.net. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBoyer, Honorine
gro.griffith.authorCock, Ian E.


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