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dc.contributor.authorPaul, M
dc.contributor.authorCatterall, CP
dc.contributor.authorPollard, PC
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-13T02:30:33Z
dc.date.available2017-07-13T02:30:33Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.modified2014-01-22T23:26:50Z
dc.identifier.issn0266-0032
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/sum.12055
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/55983
dc.description.abstractSpatial variability presents a challenge for effective measurement of ecological processes in soil ecosystems. This study characterized the heterogeneity of seven different biotic and abiotic soil properties at three ecological scales: land-use type (vegetation type), site (scale of km to tens of km, and subplot (10-30 m). We addressed three questions about soil properties: (i) Do they differ more at any ecological scale when compared with other scales? (ii) Does physically combining samples from replicate subplots affect their measurement? (iii) What are the implications of this variation for the detection of differences caused by changing land-use? There were five land-use types: remnant rainforest, pasture, ecological restoration plantings 10-15 yrs old, 40-50 yrs regrowth dominated by the non-native tree camphor laurel (Cinnamomum camphora) and rainforest regrowth 3-6 yrs after poisoning of camphor trees within older regrowth. Sites were interspersed within a 750 km2 region of subtropical Eastern Australia. In general, variability was greatest at the site and subplot levels. Soil water content, soil organic matter and pH were less variable than total organic carbon, microbial biomass, nitrate and nitrification. Power analyses using total organic carbon and nitrate showed that adequate replication at both site and subplot levels was important for detecting effects of land-use type, although increased replication was slightly more effective for subplots than for sites. Subplot spacing was relatively unimportant. Physically combining subplot samples to yield one aggregate measurement per site was successful in reducing analytical effort without sacrificing accuracy for all soil properties except total organic carbon and nitrification.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom457
dc.relation.ispartofpageto467
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSoil Use and Management
dc.relation.ispartofvolume29
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchForestry Management and Environment
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSoil Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCrop and Pasture Production
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode070504
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0503
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0703
dc.titleEffects of spatial heterogeneity and subsample pooling on the measurement of abiotic and biotic soil properties in rainforest, pasture and reforested sites
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorCatterall, Carla P.
gro.griffith.authorPollard, Peter C.
gro.griffith.authorPaul, Miriam


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