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dc.contributor.authorSmyth, Wendy
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Elaine
dc.contributor.authorBeattie, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorGardner, Anne
dc.contributor.authorMoyle, Wendy
dc.contributor.authorFranklin, Sara
dc.contributor.authorHines, Sonia
dc.contributor.authorMacAndrew, Margaret
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:30:59Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:30:59Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.modified2014-01-22T23:28:54Z
dc.identifier.issn1471-2318
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2318-13-2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/55987
dc.description.abstractBackground Continued aging of the population is expected to be accompanied by substantial increases in the number of people with dementia and in the number of health care staff required to care for them. Adequate knowledge about dementia among health care staff is important to the quality of care delivered to this vulnerable population. The purpose of this study was to assess knowledge about dementia across a range of health care staff in a regional health service district. Methods Knowledge levels were investigated via the validated 30-item Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale (ADKS). All health service district staff with e-mail access were invited to participate in an online survey. Knowledge levels were compared across demographic categories, professional groups, and by whether the respondent had any professional or personal experience caring for someone with dementia. The effect of dementia-specific training or education on knowledge level was also evaluated. Results A diverse staff group (N?=?360), in terms of age, professional group (nursing, medicine, allied health, support staff) and work setting from a regional health service in Queensland, Australia responded. Overall knowledge about Alzheimer's disease was of a generally moderate level with significant differences being observed by professional group and whether the respondent had any professional or personal experience caring for someone with dementia. Knowledge was lower for some of the specific content domains of the ADKS, especially those that were more medically-oriented, such as 'risk factors' and 'course of the disease.' Knowledge was higher for those who had experienced dementia-specific training, such as attendance at a series of relevant workshops. Conclusions Specific deficits in dementia knowledge were identified among Australian health care staff, and the results suggest dementia-specific training might improve knowledge. As one piece of an overall plan to improve health care delivery to people with dementia, this research supports the role of introducing systematic dementia-specific education or training.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent189583 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto8
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalBMC Geriatrics
dc.relation.ispartofvolume13
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSports science and exercise
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAged care nursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3202
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4207
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode420502
dc.titleA survey-based study of knowledge of Alzheimer's disease among health care staff
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0
gro.description.notepublicPage numbers are not for citation purposes. Instead, this article has the unique article number of 2.
gro.rights.copyright© 2013 Smyth et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorMoyle, Wendy


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