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dc.contributor.authorHagem, Rabee
dc.contributor.authorHaelsig, Tim
dc.contributor.authorO'Keefe, Steven
dc.contributor.authorStamm, Andy
dc.contributor.authorFickenscher, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorThiel, David
dc.contributor.editorSubic, Fuss, Clifton & Chan
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-14T22:58:14Z
dc.date.available2017-09-14T22:58:14Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.modified2014-01-23T22:51:50Z
dc.identifier.issn1877-7058en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.proeng.2013.07.065en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/56070
dc.description.abstractSwimmers performance evaluation is important for the swimmers, their coaches and trainers. Most systems depend on visual, video processing or sensors and require post processing to obtain the swim data. Stroke rate, stroke length and swim velocity data are useful parameters for a swimmer during a swim. Swimmers can then adjust their swim to achieve optimal performance. A wearable data processing system was designed, implemented and tested using visible light communication. A wrist-mounted accelerometer with a communications link to a receiver located on the goggles allows visual information to be given to the athlete. This helps swimmers to swim with consistent pace based on a multi-coloured display. The data processing system was based on a circular buffer to read real time acceleration data. The maximum acceleration and the position of the maximum acceleration during one stroke are determined in firmware. The time difference between strokes is transmitted to the goggles. An algorithm at the receiver uses the data to switch on the LED colour so that the swimmer reacts according to previous instructions. The second generation system (size 35 x 35 mm, cost $19.89AU) was designed and implemented. The system was tested with different swim speeds (slow and fast) and different strokes (free style, back stroke, breast stroke and butterfly) to validate the system. These experiments were used to optimise the system and verify that the complete system is viable under different conditions, styles and swimmers.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom34en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto39en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalProcedia Engineeringen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume60en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchBiomedical Instrumentationen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCircuits and Systemsen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode090303en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode090601en_US
dc.titleSecond generation swimming feedback device using a wearable data processing system based on underwater visible light communicationsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/en_US
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Engineeringen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Open access under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0) License which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, providing that the work is properly cited. You may not alter, transform, or build upon this work.en_US
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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