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dc.contributor.authorHaugh, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:00:09Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:00:09Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.modified2014-02-11T22:30:23Z
dc.identifier.issn03782166
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pragma.2012.11.009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/56685
dc.description.abstractSpeaker meaning is generally defined in pragmatics in terms of the speaker's intentions. The received view is that a speaker means something by intending that the hearer recognise what is meant as intended by the speaker, thereby grounding speaker meaning in a presumed cognitive reality. In this paper it is proposed that speaker meaning can also be conceptualised from a social, deontological perspective where the speaker is held accountable to the moral order for what he or she is taken to mean in interaction. Speaker meaning in this sense encompasses moral or ethical concerns such as rights, obligations, responsibilities, permissibility, and thus is a real-world, consequential concept for participants in interaction. One result of this real-world consequentiality is that the degree of accountability for speaker meanings can be observed to be disputed by participants in both institutional and everyday talk. A second consequence is that the degree of accountability for speaker meanings can be modulated through various meaning-actions that either increase or decrease a speaker's level of accountability for particular meanings. The practice of not-saying is argued to be one relatively neglected meaning-action through which speakers may decrease their level of accountability in interaction. It is concluded that work remains to investigate whether a deontic conceptualisation of speaker meaning can be reconciled with the received view.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent239552 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom41
dc.relation.ispartofpageto56
dc.relation.ispartofissue1
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Pragmatics
dc.relation.ispartofvolume48
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchDiscourse and Pragmatics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLinguistics
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPhilosophy
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode200403
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2004
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2203
dc.titleSpeaker meaning and accountability in interaction
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyArts, Education & Law Group, School of Languages and Linguistics
gro.rights.copyright© 2013 Elsevier B.V.. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorHaugh, Michael B.


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