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dc.contributor.authorBurke, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorCurtis, Carey
dc.contributor.authorWhitzman, Carolyn
dc.contributor.authorTranter, Paul
dc.contributor.authorArmit, Chris
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Mitch
dc.contributor.editorKristian Ruming, Bill Randolph and Nicole Gurran
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-30T12:31:50Z
dc.date.available2017-10-30T12:31:50Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.modified2014-02-16T23:15:47Z
dc.identifier.refurihttp://www.soacconference.com.au/
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/56798
dc.description.abstractAbstract: Development at the fringes of Australian cities commonly takes the form of large masterplanned estates incorporating significant features of New Urbanist design. Connective street networks, off-street pathways and footpaths provided on every street, with civic buildings located in or near neighbourhood centres, are in marked contrast to 1980s suburban design. Both the theoryunderpinning New Urbanism and the marketing of these estates suggests they should increase rates of children walking and cycling to school. The CATCH and iMATCH studies have captured the travel behaviour and attitudes of 10-13 year old children and their parents at nine primary schools in Rockhampton, Brisbane, Melbourne and Perth. Included was a large master-planned estate in Ipswich City, in Brisbane's west, that embodies these New Urbanist design features. The research used travel diaries and attitudinal surveys amongst other methods. This paper focuses on the results from the 250 children that completed travel diaries. Key measures include mode share and children's independent mobility rates for the schools in the sample, and related variables such as bicycle ownership. The results suggest the Ipswich master-planned estate had relatively low mode shares for walking, cycling and other non-motorised travel to school, as compared to other schools in the sample. Preliminary analysis suggests that school catchment size, which is increasingly large in these new estates, the 'busyness' of parents, and a lack of supportive policy interventions may each be associated with this limited take up of children's walking and cycling to school. Key words: children's travel behaviour, journeys-to-school, New Urbanism, master-planned estates.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent230682 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherState of Australian Cities Research Network
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.soacconference.com.au/soac-conference-proceedings-and-powerpoint-presentations/
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofconferencenameSOAC 2013
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitleState of Australian Cities Conference
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2013-11-26
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2013-11-29
dc.relation.ispartoflocationSydney, Australia
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchUrban Design
dc.subject.fieldofresearchTransport Planning
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode120508
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode120506
dc.titleAre Master-Planned New Urbanist Suburbs a 'Solution' for Sustainable Travel to Schools? Comparing children's travel in select Australian primary schools
dc.typeConference output
dc.type.descriptionE1 - Conferences
dc.type.codeE - Conference Publications
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2013. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this conference please refer to the conference’s website or contact the authors.
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorBurke, Matthew I.


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