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dc.contributor.authorJi, Yinqiu
dc.contributor.authorAshton, Louise
dc.contributor.authorPedley, Scott M
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, David P
dc.contributor.authorTang, Yong
dc.contributor.authorNakamura, Akihiro
dc.contributor.authorKitching, Roger
dc.contributor.authorDolman, Paul M
dc.contributor.authorWoodcock, Paul
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Felicity A
dc.contributor.authorLarsen, Trond H
dc.contributor.authorHsu, Wayne W
dc.contributor.authorBenedick, Suzan
dc.contributor.authorHamer, Keith C
dc.contributor.authorWilcove, David S
dc.contributor.authorBruce, Catharine
dc.contributor.authorWang, Xiaoyang
dc.contributor.authorLevi, Taal
dc.contributor.authorLott, Martin
dc.contributor.authorEmerson, Brent C
dc.contributor.authorYu, Douglas W
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T14:09:14Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T14:09:14Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn1461-023X
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ele.12162
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/56911
dc.description.abstractTo manage and conserve biodiversity, one must know what is being lost, where, and why, as well as which remedies are likely to be most effective. Metabarcoding technology can characterise the species compositions of mass samples of eukaryotes or of environmental DNA. Here, we validate metabarcoding by testing it against three high-quality standard data sets that were collected in Malaysia (tropical), China (subtropical) and the United Kingdom (temperate) and that comprised 55,813 arthropod and bird specimens identified to species level with the expenditure of 2,505 person-hours of taxonomic expertise. The metabarcode and standard data sets exhibit statistically correlated alpha- and beta-diversities, and the two data sets produce similar policy conclusions for two conservation applications: restoration ecology and systematic conservation planning. Compared with standard biodiversity data sets, metabarcoded samples are taxonomically more comprehensive, many times quicker to produce, less reliant on taxonomic expertise and auditable by third parties, which is essential for dispute resolution.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent4087662 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationY
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1245
dc.relation.ispartofpageto1257
dc.relation.ispartofissue10
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEcology Letters
dc.relation.ispartofvolume16
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcological Applications not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcological Applications
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEvolutionary Biology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050199
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0501
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0603
dc.titleReliable, verifiable and efficient monitoring of biodiversity via metabarcoding
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. The definitive version is available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/
gro.date.issued2014-11-07T00:20:57Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorKitching, Roger L.
gro.griffith.authorNakamura, Aki
gro.griffith.authorAshton, Louise A.


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