Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDavidson, Carlos
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, Craig E.
dc.contributor.authorVincent, Kim
dc.contributor.authorSimonich, Staci Massey
dc.contributor.authorYip, Kerri Stanley
dc.contributor.authorHero, Jean-Marc
dc.contributor.authorM. Kriger, Kerry
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T11:08:24Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T11:08:24Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.modified2014-03-24T04:52:53Z
dc.identifier.issn19317603
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/57183
dc.description.abstractAlthough the best known cases of enigmatic amphibian population declines come from mountains, the broader relationship between declines and elevation has not been well examined. We analyzed data from the Global Amphibian Assessment (GAA) and minimum and maximum elevation range data to study the association between elevation and population status for 1,918 anuran species in the Western Hemisphere (i.e., North, Central and South America and adjacent islands). Multifactorial analysis with generalized additive models indicated that enigmatic declines increase consistently with elevation, even after accounting for geographic range area, spatial autocorrelation, and species phylogenetic relationships. Although the GAA data are coarse, we found a continuous increase in the percentage of species experiencing enigmatic declines with increasing elevation, starting at sea-level, suggesting that declines in mountains may simply be the upper end of a continuum. Establishing the existence of a strong elevational gradient in population declines will help focus amphibian decline research on factors that could possibly produce such a pattern, such as the role of temperature in disease dynamics.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherHerpetological Conservation and Biology
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.herpconbio.org/contents_vol8_issue3.html
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom503
dc.relation.ispartofpageto518
dc.relation.ispartofissue3
dc.relation.ispartofjournalHerpetological Conservation and Biology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume8
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchLandscape Ecology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEnvironmental Science and Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchEcology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchZoology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050104
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0502
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0602
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode0608
dc.titleAnuran population declines occur on an elevational gradient in the western hemisphere
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorHero, Jean-Marc


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record