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dc.contributor.authorTrembath, David
dc.contributor.authorIacono, Teresa
dc.contributor.authorLyon, Katie
dc.contributor.authorWest, Denise
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Hilary
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T16:12:22Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T16:12:22Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn1362-3613
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1362361313486204
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/57251
dc.description.abstractMany adults with autism spectrum disorders have complex communication needs and may benefit from the use of augmentative and alternative communication. However, there is a lack of research examining the specific communication needs of these adults, let alone the outcomes of interventions aimed at addressing them. The aim of this study was to explore the views and experiences of support workers and family members regarding the outcomes of providing low-technology communication aids to adults with autism spectrum disorders. The participants were six support workers and two family members of six men and women with autism spectrum disorders, who had received low-technology communication aids. Using semi-structured, in-depth interviews and following thematic analysis, the results revealed strong support for, and the potential benefits of, augmentative and alternative communication for both adults with autism spectrum disorders and their communication partners. The results also revealed inconsistencies in the actions taken to support the use of the prescribed augmentative and alternative communication systems, pointing to the clinical need to address common barriers to the provision of augmentative and alternative communication support. These barriers include organisational practices and limitations in the knowledge and skills of key stakeholders, as well as problematic attitudes.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent614215 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSage Publications
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom1
dc.relation.ispartofpageto13
dc.relation.ispartofissuen/a
dc.relation.ispartofjournalAutism
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSpecialist Studies in Education
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1303
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702
dc.titleAugmentative and alternative communication supports for adults with autism spectrum disorders
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2013 SAGE Publications and The National Autistic Society. This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2014-11-07T00:20:08Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorTrembath, David


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