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dc.contributor.authorHollings, Traceyen_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, Mennaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMooney, Nicken_US
dc.contributor.authorMcCallum, Hamishen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:37:42Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:37:42Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.issn22132244en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijppaw.2013.02.002en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/57405
dc.description.abstractChanging ecosystem dynamics are increasing the threat of disease epidemics arising in wildlife populations. Several recent disease outbreaks have highlighted the critical need for understanding pathogen dynamics, including the role host densities play in disease transmission. In Australia, introduced feral cats are of immense concern because of the risk they pose to native wildlife through predation and competition. They are also the only known definitive host of the coccidian parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, the population-level impacts of which are unknown in any species. Australia's native wildlife have not evolved in the presence of cats or their parasites, and feral cats may be linked with several native mammal declines and extinctions. In Tasmania there is emerging evidence that feral cat populations are increasing following wide-ranging and extensive declines in the apex predator, the Tasmanian devil, from a consistently fatal transmissible cancer. We assess whether feral cat density is associated with the seroprevalence of T. gondii in native wildlife to determine whether an increasing population of feral cats may correspond to an increased level of risk to naive native intermediate hosts. We found evidence that seroprevalence of T. gondii in Tasmanian pademelons was lower in the north-west of Tasmania than in the north-east and central regions where cat density was higher. Also, samples obtained from road-killed animals had significantly higher seroprevalence of T. gondii than those from culled individuals, suggesting there may be behavioural differences associated with infection. In addition, seroprevalence in different trophic levels was assessed to determine whether position in the food-web influences exposure risk. Higher order carnivores had significantly higher seroprevalence than medium-sized browser species. The highest seroprevalence observed in an intermediate host was 71% in spotted-tailed quolls (Dasyurus maculatus), the largest mammalian mesopredator, in areas of low cat density. Mesopredator release of cats may be a significant issue for native species conservation, potentially affecting the population viability of many endangered species.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent878290 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationYen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom110en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto118en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlifeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume2en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchInvasive Species Ecologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPopulation Ecologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchVeterinary Parasitologyen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050103en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060207en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode070708en_US
dc.titleWildlife disease ecology in changing landscapes: Mesopredator release and toxoplasmosisen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dcterms.licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Australian Society for Parasitology. This is an open access article under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) that permits non-commercial distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
gro.date.issued2015-03-25T02:44:08Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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