Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRussell, Emily
dc.contributor.authorChan, Raymond Javan
dc.contributor.authorMarsh, Nicole
dc.contributor.authorNew, Karen
dc.contributor.editor231
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-30T12:31:07Z
dc.date.available2019-01-30T12:31:07Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.date.modified2014-05-22T22:18:06Z
dc.identifier.issn1462-3889
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ejon.2013.11.010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/57649
dc.description.abstractPurpose The use of intravascular devices is associated with a number of potential complications. Despite a number of evidence-based clinical guidelines in this area, there continues to be nursing practice discrepancies. This study aims to examine nursing practice in a cancer care setting to identify nursing practice and areas for improvement respective to best available evidence. Methods A point prevalence survey was undertaken in a tertiary cancer care centre in Queensland, Australia. On a randomly selected day, four nurses assessed intravascular device related nursing practices and collected data using a standardized survey tool. Results 58 inpatients (100%) were assessed. Forty-eight (83%) had a device in situ, comprising 14 Peripheral Intravenous Catheters (29.2%), 14 Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters (29.2%), 14 Hickman catheters (29.2%) and six Port-a-Caths (12.4%). Suboptimal outcomes such as incidences of local site complications, incorrect/inadequate documentation, lack of flushing orders, and unclean/non intact dressings were observed. Conclusions This study has highlighted a number of intravascular device related nursing practice discrepancies compared with current hospital policy. Education and other implementation strategies can be applied to improve nursing practice. Following education strategies, it will be valuable to repeat this survey on a regular basis to provide feedback to nursing staff and implement strategies to improve practice. More research is required to provide evidence to clinical practice with regards to intravascular device related consumables, flushing technique and protocols.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent315137 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherChurchill Livingstone
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom231
dc.relation.ispartofpageto235
dc.relation.ispartofissue5
dc.relation.ispartofjournalEuropean Journal of Oncology Nursing
dc.relation.ispartofvolume3
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchOncology and Carcinogenesis
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111003
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1110
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1112
dc.titleA point prevalence study of cancer nursing practices for managing intravascular devices in an Australian tertiary cancer center
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.rights.copyright© 2013 Elsevier. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorChan, Ray
gro.griffith.authorMarsh, Nicole M.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record