Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAnsong, Michael
dc.contributor.authorPickering, Catherine
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:20:56Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:20:56Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.modified2014-06-11T03:13:58Z
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0080275
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/57759
dc.description.abstractWhen traveling in cars, we can unintentionally carry and disperse weed seed; but which species, and where are they a problem? To answer these questions, we systematically searched the scientific literature to identify all original research studies that assess seed transported by cars and listed the species with seed on/in cars. From the 13 studies that fit these criteria, we found 626 species from 75 families that have seed that can be dispersed by cars. Of these, 599 are listed as weeds in some part of the world, with 439 listed as invasive or naturalized alien species in one or more European countries, 248 are invasive/noxious weeds in North America, 370 are naturalized alien species in Australia, 167 are alien species in India, 77 are invasive species in China and 23 are declared weeds/ invaders in South Africa. One hundred and one are classified as internationally important environmental weeds. Although most (487) were only recorded once, some species such as Chenopodium album, Poa pratensis and Trifolium repens were common among studies. Perennial graminoids seem to be favoured over annual graminoids while annual forbs are favoured over perennial forbs. Species characteristics including seed size and morphology and where the plants grew affected the probability that their seed was transported by cars. Seeds can be found in many different places on cars including under the chassis, front and rear bumpers, wheel wells and rims, front and back mudguards, wheel arches, tyres and on interior floor mats. With increasing numbers of cars and expanding road networks in many regions, these results highlight the importance of cars as a dispersal mechanism, and how it may favour invasions by some species over others. Strategies to reduce the risk of seed dispersal by cars include reducing seed on cars by mowing road verges and cleaning cars.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent460309 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statres
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationY
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrome80275-1
dc.relation.ispartofpagetoe80275-11
dc.relation.ispartofissue11
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPLoS ONE
dc.relation.ispartofvolume8
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchTerrestrial Ecology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNatural Resource Management
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode060208
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode050209
dc.titleAre weeds hitchhiking a ride on your car? A systematic review of seed dispersal on cars
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
dcterms.licensehttp://www.plos.org/journals/license.html
gro.facultyGriffith Sciences, Griffith School of Environment
gro.rights.copyright© 2013 Ansong et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CCAL. (http://www.plos.org/journals/license.html)
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorPickering, Catherine M.
gro.griffith.authorAnsong, Michael


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Journal articles
    Contains articles published by Griffith authors in scholarly journals.

Show simple item record