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dc.contributor.authorZhang, Lien_US
dc.contributor.authorKeogh, Samanthaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRickard, Claireen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T15:51:19Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T15:51:19Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.date.modified2014-04-03T04:00:47Z
dc.identifier.issn1176-9114en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2147/IJN.S50312en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/57799
dc.description.abstractIntravascular catheter-related infections are still a major problem in health care and are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and additional cost. The formation of microbial biofilm on catheters makes these infections particularly complicated, as microbial cells that detach from the biofilm can lead to infection, and because these microorganisms are highly resistant to many antimicrobial agents; thus, catheter removal is often required to successfully treat infection. To reduce the risks of catheter-related infections, many strategies have been applied, such as improvements in aseptic insertion and post-insertion care practices, implantation techniques, and antibiotic coated or impregnated materials. However, despite significant advances in using these methods, it has not been possible to completely eradicate biofilm infections. Currently, nanotechnology approaches seem to be among the most promising for preventing biofilm formation and resultant catheter-related bloodstream infection (especially with multi-resistant bacterial strains). In this review, current knowledge about catheter technology and design, the mechanisms of catheter-related bloodstream infection, and the insertion and care practices performed by medical staff, are discussed, along with novel, achievable approaches to infection prevention, based on nanotechnology.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.format.extent1095239 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherDove Medical Pressen_US
dc.publisher.placeNew Zealanden_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom4453en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto4466en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Nanomedicineen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume8en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111003en_US
dc.titleReducing the risk of infection associated with vascular access devices through nanotechnology: a perspectiveen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwiferyen_US
gro.rights.copyright© 2013 Zhang et al, publisher and licencee Dove Medical Press Ltd. This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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