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dc.contributor.authorAitken, Leanne M
dc.contributor.authorChaboyer, Wendy
dc.contributor.authorSchuetz, Michael
dc.contributor.authorJoyce, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorMacfarlane, Bonnie
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-13T02:30:42Z
dc.date.available2017-07-13T02:30:42Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.date.modified2014-05-22T22:18:01Z
dc.identifier.issn0962-1067
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jocn.12026
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/57869
dc.description.abstractAims and objectives To describe the recovery of trauma intensive care patients up to six months posthospital discharge. Background Injury is a leading cause of preventable mortality and morbidity worldwide, with approximately 10% of hospitalised trauma patients being admitted to intensive care. Intensive care patients experience significant ongoing physical and psychological burden after discharge; however, the patterns of recovery and the subgroups of intensive care patients who experience the greatest burden are not described. Design This prospective cohort study was conducted in one tertiary referral hospital in south-east Queensland, Australia. Methods Following ethics approval, injured patients who required admission to intensive care provided consent. Participants completed questionnaires prior to hospital discharge (n = 123) and one (n = 93) and six months (n = 88) later. Data included demographic and socioeconomic details, pre-injury health, injury characteristics, acute care factors, postacute factors [self-efficacy, illness perception, perceived social support and psychological status as measured by the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10) and the PTSD Civilian Checklist] and health status (SF-36). Results All participants required ongoing support from healthcare providers in the six months after discharge from hospital, and approximately half required support services such as accommodation and home modifications. Approximately 20% of participants reported post-traumatic stress symptoms, while approximately half the participants reported psychological distress. Average quality of life scores were significantly below the Australian norms both one and six months postdischarge. Conclusions Trauma intensive care patients rely on ongoing healthcare professional and social support services. Compromised health-related quality of life and psychological health persists at six months. Relevance to clinical practice Effective discharge planning and communication across the care continuum is essential to facilitate access to healthcare providers and other support services in the community setting.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent185092 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom704
dc.relation.ispartofpageto715
dc.relation.ispartofissue5-6
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
dc.relation.ispartofvolume23
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchIntensive care
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchAcute care
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode320212
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4205
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode420501
dc.titleHealth status of critically ill trauma patients
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery
gro.rights.copyright© 2013 Wiley-Blackwell Publishing. This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.The definitive version is available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorChaboyer, Wendy


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