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dc.contributor.authorHaebich, Anna
dc.contributor.editorGlenn R. Cooke
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-06T06:30:05Z
dc.date.available2017-09-06T06:30:05Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.date.modified2009-08-10T06:26:47Z
dc.identifier.issn13218166en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1321816600003305en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/5789
dc.description.abstractThe bunya pine has a special meaning for Queenslanders, being endemic to the Bunya Mountains and Blackall Ranges in the South-East corner of the state, with a small stand in North Queensland. The bunya holds particular significance for local Indigenous peoples. They are bound to the tree through custodial rights and obligations and systems of traditional environmental knowledge that incorporate ‘classification …empirical observations of the local environment… [and] self-management that governs resource use’, built up through generations of interaction with the bunya forests. Indigenous groups celebrated their spiritual links to the bunya pine in large seasonal gatherings where they feasted on its edible nuts and performed ceremonies, adjudicated disputes and traded goods. The bunya's majestic height, striking unique silhouette, dark green foliage, unique botanical features and Indigenous associations held a fascination for colonial artists, natural scientists, entrepreneurs and gardeners. Over the years they assumed custodianship of the bunya pine, assimilating it into Western scientific, economic, legal, horticultural, environmental and symbolic systems, which replaced Indigenous custodial rights, obligations and knowledge. The spectacular bunya gatherings were mythologised in colonial writings as mystical, primeval ceremonies and barbaric rituals. Despite ‘fierce and actively hostile tribal resistance’ to colonisation of their lands, Indigenous groups were progressively driven out of the bunya forests. Empty landscapes left by the retreating forests – victims of timber felling and land clearing – came to symbolise the vanishing ceremonies and dwindling Aboriginal populations of South-East Queensland. While surviving Indigenous groups were swept into centralised reserves and settlements from the late nineteenth century, so too the bunya trees were cordoned off in 1908, for their own protection, in Queensland's second national park at the Bunya Mountains, where they stood ‘like the spirits of the departed original Queenslanders, mourning over the days which are forever gone’.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_AU
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherQueensland Studies Centre, Griffith Universityen_US
dc.publisher.placeNathan, Australiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom47en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto57en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue2en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalQueensland Reviewen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume10en_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode430101en_US
dc.titleAssimilating nature: the Bunya diasporaen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
gro.rights.copyrightCopyright 2003 University of Queensland Press. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal's website for access to the definitive, published version.en_US
gro.date.issued2003
gro.hasfulltextFull Text


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