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dc.contributor.authorBaker, Gideon
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T12:43:27Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T12:43:27Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.modified2014-04-15T22:21:16Z
dc.identifier.issn00905917
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0090591712470628
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/58466
dc.description.abstractUnderlying Giorgio Agamben's and Alain Badiou's disagreement over the apostle Paul we find common cause: following Paul's deactivation of law, both Agamben and Badiou see the fixed identities necessary to the naturalised nomos of State politics as transfigured by a politics of grace. This transfiguration is differently rendered as either the emergence of a universal subject (Badiou) or the opening up of existing subjectivities (Agamben), but both the messianic vocation in Agamben and the universal subject in Badiou allow subjective possibility to that which is not in the present objectified order. Developing this theme of a basic emancipatory affinity, two moments of the political which exist in a difficult but necessary tension are identified: revolution and dissent. While revolution signals subjective possibility itself by determining that the truth of the event is for all, dissidence keeps that possibility alive by pointing to the human subject's fundamental indeterminacy.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSage
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom312
dc.relation.ispartofpageto335
dc.relation.ispartofissue2
dc.relation.ispartofjournalPolitical Theory
dc.relation.ispartofvolume41
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPhilosophy not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolitical Science not elsewhere classified
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPolitical Science
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPhilosophy
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode220399
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160699
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1606
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode2203
dc.titleThe Revolution Is Dissent: Reconciling Agamben and Badiou on Paul
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorBaker, Gideon B.


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