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dc.contributor.authorCatling-Paull, Christineen_US
dc.contributor.authorCoddington, Rebecca L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFoureur, Maralyn J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHomer, Caroline S. E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEllwood, Daviden_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-26T12:30:28Z
dc.date.available2018-07-26T12:30:28Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.date.modified2014-04-15T22:51:18Z
dc.identifier.issn0025729Xen_US
dc.identifier.doidoi:10.5694/mja12.11665en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/58521
dc.description.abstractObjective: To report maternal and neonatal outcomes for Australian women planning a publicly funded homebirth from 2005 to 2010. Design, setting and subjects: Retrospective analysis of data on women who planned a homebirth and on their babies. Data for 2005-2010 (or from the commencement of a program to 2010) were requested from the 12 publicly funded homebirth programs in place at the time. Main outcome measures: Maternal outcomes (mortality; place and mode of birth; perineal trauma; type of management of the third stage of labour; postpartum haemorrhage; transfer to hospital); and neonatal outcomes (early mortality; Apgar score at 5 minutes; birthweight; breastfeeding initially and at 6 weeks; significant morbidity; transfer to hospital; admission to a special care nursery). Results: Nine publicly funded homebirth programs in Australia provided data accounting for 97% of births in these programs during the period studied. Of the 1807 women who intended to give birth at home at the onset of labour, 1521 (84%) did so. 315 (17%) were transferred to hospital during labour or within one week of giving birth. The rate of stillbirth and early neonatal death was 3.3 per 1000 births; when deaths because of expected fetal anomalies were excluded it was 1.7 per 1000 births. The rate of normal vaginal birth was 90%. Conclusion: This study provides the first national evaluation of a significant proportion of women choosing publicly funded homebirth in Australia; however, the sample size does not have sufficient power to draw a conclusion about safety. More research is warranted into the safety of alternative places of birth within Australia.en_US
dc.description.peerreviewedYesen_US
dc.description.publicationstatusYesen_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherAustralasian Medical Publishing Company Pty Ltden_US
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationNen_US
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom616en_US
dc.relation.ispartofpageto620en_US
dc.relation.ispartofissue11en_US
dc.relation.ispartofjournalMedical Journal of Australiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofvolume198en_US
dc.rights.retentionYen_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode119999en_US
dc.titlePublicly funded homebirth in Australia: a review of maternal and neonatal outcomes over 6 yearsen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Peer Reviewed (HERDC)en_US
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articlesen_US
dc.description.versionPublisheden_US
gro.rights.copyrightCatling-Paull C, Coddington RL, Foureur MJ, et al. Publicly funded homebirth in Australia: a review of maternal and neonatal outcomes over 6 years. Med J Aust 2013; 198 (11): 616-620. © Copyright 2013 The Medical Journal of Australia – reproduced with permission.en_US
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorEllwood, David


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