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dc.contributor.authorLaw, Chi-kin
dc.contributor.authorKolves, Kairi
dc.contributor.authorDe Leo, Diego
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-27T01:30:43Z
dc.date.available2017-07-27T01:30:43Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn0933-7954
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00127-013-0769-9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/58566
dc.description.abstractPurpose Generally, due to limited availability of official statistics on the topic, little is known about suicide mortality in second-generation migrants. A recent study from Sweden showed that these people could be at a high suicide risk. In a generalised phenomenon, this aspect would represent an important issue in suicide prevention. This paper aims to report the profile of second-generation migrants who died by suicide and the suicide risk differentials of second-generation migrants with other Australians. Methods Official suicide data from 2001 to 2008 were linked with State/Territory registries to collect information about the birthplace of the deceased's parents to differentiate migration status (first, second or third-plus generation). The profile and suicide risk of second-generation migrants were compared with other generations by logistic and Poisson regression. Results Suicide in second-generation migrants accounted for 811 cases (14.6 %). These tended to be represented by younger subjects, more often never married, as compared to the other cases. Second-generation males aged 25-39 years tended to have a higher suicide risk than first-generation migrants, but the risk was lower when compared with the third-plus generation. Second-generation migrants aged 60+ tended to have a lower suicide risk than first-generation migrants. Conclusion In Australia, second-generation migrants are not at a higher suicide risk as compared to first-generation migrants or locals (third-plus-generation). In males aged 25-39, a lower suicide risk was found in second-generations as compared to Australian-born third generation, which may be explained by their more advantageous socioeconomic status and the flexibility and resources rendered by having grown up in a bicultural environment. The higher suicide rates found amongst older first-generation migrants require further examination.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent531915 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Medizin
dc.publisher.placeGermany
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom601
dc.relation.ispartofpageto608
dc.relation.ispartofissue4
dc.relation.ispartofjournalSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
dc.relation.ispartofvolume49
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMental Health
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchCognitive Sciences
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111714
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1103
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1702
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.titleSuicide mortality in second-generation migrants, Australia, 2001-2008
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, Australian Institute for Suicide Research & Prevention
gro.rights.copyright© 2014 Springer Berlin / Heidelberg. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
gro.date.issued2015-08-06T00:11:21Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorDe Leo, Diego
gro.griffith.authorKolves, Kairi
gro.griffith.authorLaw, Chi Kin


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