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dc.contributor.authorGillespie, Brigid M
dc.contributor.authorChaboyer, Wendy
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Pamela
dc.contributor.authorMorely, Nicola
dc.contributor.authorNieuwenhoven, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-13T02:30:50Z
dc.date.available2017-07-13T02:30:50Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn0962-1067
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jocn.12479
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/58652
dc.description.abstractAIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe the self-reported wound care practices of acute care nurses practising in a large metropolitan hospital in Queensland, Australia. BACKGROUND: Wound infections occur in up to 30% of surgical procedures and are the third most commonly reported hospital-acquired infection. The growing complexity and cost of wound care demand that nurses use wound care knowledge based on best practice guidelines. DESIGN: Descriptive cross-sectional survey design. METHODS: A convenience sample of 250 medical and surgical nurses working in an acute care facility was invited to complete a 42-item survey. The survey was based on an extensive literature review and an environmental scan of wound care issues in major hospitals, Australia. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 120 acute care nurses with a response rate of 48%. Ninety (75.6%) respondents reported that 'wound appearance' was the most important factor guiding their choice of dressing product. Only 6 (5.0%) respondents considered the cost of a dressing product 'highly important'. Fifty-nine (50.4%) respondents reported being 'unaware' of the national standards pertaining to wound management, and only 41 (34.7%) respondents reported that their knowledge of wound products was 'good' or 'excellent'. The majority (n = 89, 75.4%) of respondents used the hospital's wound care specialist nurses as the primary source of information in regard to managing acute wounds. CONCLUSIONS: Although acute care nurses have a sound knowledge of wound healing processes, it appears that many do not use the recommended clinical guideline pertaining to wound care. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: While it is important for nurses to detect early wound complications, treatment plans based on wound assessments need to be informed by current clinical
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent579655 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom2618
dc.relation.ispartofpageto2627
dc.relation.ispartofissue17-18
dc.relation.ispartofjournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
dc.relation.ispartofvolume23
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchClinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)
dc.subject.fieldofresearchNursing
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPublic Health and Health Services
dc.subject.fieldofresearchPsychology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode111003
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1110
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1117
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode1701
dc.titleWound care practices: a survey of acute care nurses
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery
gro.rights.copyright© 2013 Wiley-Blackwell Publishing. This is the author-manuscript version of the paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.The definitive version is available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/
gro.date.issued2014-12-10T21:43:04Z
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorChaboyer, Wendy
gro.griffith.authorGillespie, Brigid M.


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