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dc.contributor.convenorCraig Priest
dc.contributor.authorLI, Paul
dc.contributor.authorKhamenehfar, Avid
dc.contributor.authorKosia, Baindu
dc.contributor.authorLopez, Alejandro
dc.contributor.authorSchmidt, Chris W.
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-28
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-02T01:13:11Z
dc.date.available2017-03-02T01:13:11Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.modified2014-05-27T22:24:47Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/59287
dc.description.abstractLong-term monitoring of biochemical changes on a single cell has provided new information about unusual cellular response to reagents. A microchip device that was fabricated with a cell retention chamber allows selection, retention and shuttling of a single biological cell for long-time analysis. Excellent optical and fluorescent observation of the single cell have been simultaneously achieved. We previously reported this microfluidic method for the analysis on single multi-drug resistance (MDR) leukemia cells because MDR-mediated drug efflux is known to be a major cause of the failure of chemotherapy. This measurement method is dubbed as the same-single-cell analysis (SASCA), which takes advantages of tracking one and the same cell over a long period of time. This method is now employed to study cell-to-cell interaction in cancer research using the mouse cell model. In Australia, melanoma is the most common cancer in the 15-44 year age group and accounts for 3% of all cancer deaths. Queensland has the highest incidence rate of melanoma in the world. The murine melanoma B16OVA has been used as a model to determine in what form of cell-derived tumour antigen is cross-presented to murine dendritic cells (DCs). In this study, we have trapped one DC2114 cell in the microfluidic biochip and then bring a second type of cell (i.e. B16OVA) in close proximity to the first cell. The cell-to-cell interaction is then fluorescently imaged to show the time-course changes. We envision this study will provide insight into the mechanism of antigen cross presentation.
dc.description.peerreviewedNo
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent278605 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAustralia and New Zealand Micro/Nanofluidics
dc.publisher.placeSouth Australia
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.flinders.edu.au/events/show/event/4th-australian-and-new-zealand-micro-nanofluidic-symposium-and-student-workshop
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofconferencename4th Australia and New Zealand Micro/Nanofluidics Symposium
dc.relation.ispartofconferencetitle4th Australia and New Zealand Micro/Nanofluidics Symposium
dc.relation.ispartofdatefrom2013-04-22
dc.relation.ispartofdateto2013-06-24
dc.relation.ispartoflocationAdelaide, SA, Australia
dc.rights.retentionN
dc.subject.fieldofresearchTumour Immunology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode110709
dc.titleCell-to-cell interaction of a mouse dendritic cell and a mouse melanoma cell studied within a microfluidic chip
dc.typeConference output
dc.type.descriptionE3 - Conferences (Extract Paper)
dc.type.codee3
gro.facultyFaculty of Science, Environment, Engineering and Technology
gro.rights.copyright© The Author(s) 2013. The attached file is reproduced here in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. For information about this conference please refer to the conference’s website or contact the authors.
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorLopez Ramirez, Alejandro


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    Contains papers delivered by Griffith authors at national and international conferences.

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