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dc.contributor.authorDesbrow, Ben
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorLeveritt, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-03T13:25:51Z
dc.date.available2017-05-03T13:25:51Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.modified2014-05-27T22:25:20Z
dc.identifier.issn1526-484X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/59436
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To investigate the effect of manipulating the alcohol and sodium content of beer on fluid restoration following exercise. Method: Seven male volunteers exercised on a cycle ergometer until 1.96 ᠰ.25% body mass (mean᠓D) was lost. Participants were then randomly allocated a different beer to consume on four separate occasions. Drinks included a low-alcohol beer (2.3% ABV; LightBeer), a low-alcohol beer with 25 mmol׌-1 of added sodium (LightBeer+25), a full-strength beer (4.8% ABV; Beer), or a full-strength beer with 25 mmol׌-1 of added sodium (Beer+25). Volumes consumed were equivalent to 150% of body mass loss during exercise and were consumed over a 1h period. Body mass and urine samples were obtained before and hourly for 4 hr after beverage consumption. Results: Significantly enhanced net fluid balance was achieved following the LightBeer+25 trial (-1.02 ᠰ.35 kg) compared with the Beer (-1.59 ᠰ.32 kg) and Beer+25 (-1.64 ᠰ.28 kg) treatments. Accumulated urine output was significantly lower in the LightBeer+25 trial (1477 ᠴ85 ml) compared with the Beer+25 (2101 ᠴ82 ml) and Beer (2175 ᠳ72 ml) trials. Conclusion: A low alcohol beer with added sodium offers a potential compromise between a beverage with high social acceptance and one which avoids the exacerbated fluid losses observed when consuming full strength beer.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.format.extent543114 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherHuman Kinetics
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.publisher.urihttps://journals.humankinetics.com/view/journals/ijsnem/23/6/article-p593.xml
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom593
dc.relation.ispartofpageto600
dc.relation.ispartofjournalInternational Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism
dc.relation.ispartofvolume23
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchSports science and exercise
dc.subject.fieldofresearchMedical physiology
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode4207
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode3208
dc.titleBeer as a Sports Drink? Manipulating Beer's Ingredients to Replace Lost Fluid
dc.typeJournal article
dc.type.descriptionC1 - Articles
dc.type.codeC - Journal Articles
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Public Health
gro.rights.copyright© 2013 Human Kinetics. This is the author-manuscript version of this paper. Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Please refer to the journal website for access to the definitive, published version.
gro.hasfulltextFull Text
gro.griffith.authorDesbrow, Ben


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