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dc.contributor.authorJackson, A
dc.contributor.authorCartmel, J
dc.contributor.editorSusan E. Elliott-Johns and Daniel H. Jarvis
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-05T00:22:06Z
dc.date.available2018-10-05T00:22:06Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.date.modified2014-09-30T05:49:00Z
dc.identifier.isbn9781442614819
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10072/59526
dc.description.abstractEducators in early years' settings are confronted with a complex set of circumstances when providing quality transitions to school for children in early education and care settings in areas of socio-economic disadvantage. Starting school is recognized as a life transition and milestone for young children (Danby, Thompson, Theobald, & Thorpe, 2012; Dockett & Perry, 2009; Yeo & Clarke, 2007). As children undertake the transition from a flexible home or early years' setting to the structure of formal school, they encounter a period of change and adjustment, accompanied with new experiences, opportunities, and challenges (Bond & Maley, 2007). How children in low socio-economic areas experience and manage this transition can impact on their progress throughout the schooling system and their life after school. A positive transition to school facilitates children's initial adjustment and achievement in the school environment, providing an advantage for their later attainment and enhancing the development of positive school trajectories (Dockett & Perry, 2009; Petriwskyj, Thorpe, & Tayler, 2005). Early schooling experiences also contribute to children's developing sense of self, thus, a successful start to school has a positive influence on how children view themselves as learners (Dockett & Perry, 2009). Conversely, children who are unprepared and have a negative start to school may be disadvantaged in the school setting (Centre for Community Child Health and Telethon Institute for Child Health Research [CCCH-TICHR), 2011). Poor transitions compromise children's school engagement and attendance, and they can create a negative life pathway that is difficult to alter and impacts on children's long-term outcomes (Centre for Community Child Health [CCCJ-IJ, 2008a, 2008b). Having a positive start to school is important for young children's development and lifelong learning.
dc.description.peerreviewedYes
dc.description.publicationstatusYes
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Toronto Press
dc.publisher.placeCanada
dc.publisher.urihttps://utorontopress.com/ca/perspectives-on-transitions-in-schooling-and-instructional-practice-4
dc.relation.ispartofbooktitlePerspectives on Transitions in Schooling and Instructional Practice
dc.relation.ispartofchapter3
dc.relation.ispartofstudentpublicationN
dc.relation.ispartofpagefrom49
dc.relation.ispartofpageto72
dc.rights.retentionY
dc.subject.fieldofresearchUrban Sociology and Community Studies
dc.subject.fieldofresearchcode160810
dc.titleYoung Children's Experience of Starting School in an Area of Socio-Economic Disadvantage
dc.typeBook chapter
dc.type.descriptionB1 - Chapters
dc.type.codeB - Book Chapters
gro.facultyGriffith Health, School of Human Services and Social Work
gro.date.issued2013
gro.hasfulltextNo Full Text
gro.griffith.authorCartmel, Jennifer L.
gro.griffith.authorJackson, Amber


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